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By Well Seasoned, Dec 12 2017 12:38PM

We're delighted finally to be able to reveal the cover for Well Seasoned! After many months of hard work and debate, here it is.


We wanted something that captured the essence of the book, that would jump out at shoppers from the shelf and which is appropriate for our Spring launch date. We hope we've managed all of that.


Big thanks go to our designer Matt Inwood and the team at Anima, Head of Zeus who have been so willing to take our comments on board. Russell and I really love it but, of course, it's you the reader who really matters. What do you think??


Obviously its a big milestone as far as any book is concerned but finalising the cover also means we can now open the new website and launch pre-sales for the book. Hopefully you'll like the new fresh-look website, centred around the book. The blog will, of course, continue here with plenty of new recipes and sample content from the book.


We're really excited to be able to share some of that as we begin the countdown to the launch in March.


Welcome to an exciting new season!



PS when you click through to Amazon to pre-order you'll see a very different cover. Don't panic! That was a holding image we gave them while we were having the Big Cover Debate. We've now sent the new one and it should be updated in the next couple of days.



By Well Seasoned, Nov 3 2017 03:00AM

This is a repeat of a piece from the old Well Seasoned site but since the beginning of October, I've been up to my ears in great value, great tasting pheasant, so I thought I'd re-post. It's also worth mentioning that Russell's recipe in the previous post (Buttermilk Partridge Burgers) works very well with pheasant so there's no excuse not to be eating game of one kind or another this weekend.


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Some five years ago it was rumoured that a disgruntled KFC employee, faced with redundancy, had revealed the “secret blend” of herbs and spices used by the (in)famous fried chicken joint. A social media frenzy catapulted the recipe round the world faster than you can say “Colonel Saunders” and although the company has never publically confirmed it, the consensus seems to be that it is, at the very least, a good approximation of their recipe.


The ethical difficulties with eating KFC chicken hardly need to be spelled out on this blog. The problem is, as most of us would have to admit, it tastes pretty darn good. So what to do? Well, thankfully the angry ex-chicken-fryer's revelation has given us the opportunity to put an ethical twist on the oh-so-naughty finger lickin’ dish. Since we’re in the middle of the pheasant season we wanted to see if the recipe translated from KFC to KFP. We’re pleased to say it most definitely does.


Here’s “our” recipe using two pheasants we brought home from a small Dorset shoot last weekend. The original spice mix apparently includes mono-sodium glutamate (MSG) a flavour enhancer which we decided to forgo. We’ve tweaked the list a little more and, since pheasant has a tendency to dry out, marinading in milk gives it the required extra succulence.


Homemade KFC/KFP


Ingredients


1 teaspoon dried oregano

1 teaspoon cayenne pepper

1 teaspoon dried sage

1 teaspoon dried basil

1 teaspoon mustard powder

1 teaspoon black pepper

1 teaspoon paprika

1 teaspoon cumin

1 teaspoon garlic powder

2 teaspoons salt


4 pheasant breasts, halved (you can also use a jointed whole pheasant or free range chicken)

250g plain white flour

1/2pt whole milk

1 egg


Method


Marinade the pheasant in milk for two hours. When you're ready to cook, heat your oven to 200C. Mix the herbs, spices and flour together in a mixing bowl. Remove the pheasant breasts from the milk and pat dry with kitchen towel. Lightly beat the egg in a second bowl. Now, dip each piece of breast meat first into the egg and then into the spiced flour. (You can work in batches dipping and coating three or four pieces at a time as long as there is space in the flour bowl to move the pieces around and ensure they all get a good coating). Heat 6 tbsp of oil in a frying pan - enough to cover the base. Shallow fry the meat pieces on a high heat for 2 minutes on each side until the coating is golden brown. (Fry in batches if the pan is too crowded). Now transfer the chicken pieces to a baking tray and bake in the oven for 20 minutes until the meat is cooked through. Allow to cool for a minute or two before serving with coleslaw and beans. (Plating up in a big bucket is optional).



By Well Seasoned, Oct 31 2017 12:40PM

Earlier in the month, I hinted at a fantactic recipe Russ has been working on for the game season. This month's edition of Just About Dorset has just been published so we can reveal the recipe - a truly mouthwatering Buttermilk Partridge Burger.


Check out pages 24 to 25 of this month's Just About Dorset.


With feathered game prices at an all time low, it's definitely time to get stuck in. Enjoy!

By Well Seasoned, Oct 30 2017 05:27PM

The annual pumpkin harvest must be one of the most logistically impressive and wasteful of our entire farming year. For one night only, the bulbous orange squash becomes the country’s favourite vegetable.


Granted, these days Halloween seems to stretching over the course of several days, to cover the weekends either side but it’s still one of the biggest boom and busts we witness on a vast and annual basis. In order to cram the shops full at exactly the right time – too soon or too late means disaster – pumpkin farming is a masterclass in both scientific endeavour and military organisation.


This year, as with every other, some 20,000 tonnes of pumpkin flesh will be scraped into bins before the nation gorges on mini Mars bars and Haribo. It’s a criminal waste particularly since pumpkins are so versatile and easy to cook with.


So, before you bin the seeds or the flesh from your spectacularly spooky creation, why not resolve to have a go at one (or both) of these. If nothing else, the dentist will thank you for it:


Roasted Pumpkin Seeds


This one is so simple, it doesn’t’ really count as a recipe.


Clean any stringy flesh from your pumpkin seeds and pat dry.

Spread the seeds in a single layer on a baking tray.

Pour over a good glug of vegetable oil, sprinkle with some coarse grain salt and a couple of teaspoons of smoked paprika.

Roast for 15 minutes at 180C until the seeds are golden brown and crisp.


A horribly handy Hallowe'en party nibble.


Spiced Pumpkin Cake


This one does count as a recipe but someone else’s. It’s delicious. My one added recommendation is to squeeze some of the moisture from your pumpkin if you have a particularly wet one. If you don’t the middle will take much longer to cook, leaving the edges too dry.




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