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By Well Seasoned, Feb 14 2018 12:51PM

This is a good example of the food I love to cook at home and uses some of my favourite spices. Cumin is, for me at least, one of the truly wonderful spices, rich and aromatic with a deep savouriness. I use it often. Make this dish when the cauliflowers are abundant and serve as the main event with couscous and charred spring onions, or alternatively use it to accompany a slow-roasted shoulder of lamb.


Serves 4 as a side dish


1 whole cauliflower

50ml olive oil

1 tsp yellow mustard seeds

1 tsp ground cumin

1 pinch chilli flakes

60g unsalted butter

30g flaked almonds

1 lemon

50g sultanas, soaked in boiling water for 20 minutes

Maldon sea salt and freshly ground black pepper


1. Preheat the oven to 200˚C.


2. Remove the leaves from the cauliflower and cut out the core. Wash under a running tap and then steam or blanch in simmering water for around 6 minutes. Drain and dry off.


3. Heat the oil in a deep sauté pan, toast the mustard seeds then add the cumin and chilli flakes. Add the butter and, when it starts to foam, place the cauliflower in the pan, then season and baste with the butter. Transfer to the oven and cook, basting frequently, for approximately 15 minutes.


4. Remove the cauliflower, put the pan over a medium heat and add the almonds to the pan, allowing to toast. Remove from the heat and add a good squeeze of lemon juice. Grate some lemon zest into the pan, drain the sultanas and add them to the mix. Check the seasoning and adjust as required.


5. Pour the sultana mix over the cauliflower to serve.



By Well Seasoned, Jan 12 2018 03:05PM

Well, after nearly two years of work, Well Seasoned has finally gone to press!


It’s been quite an experience writing our first book and there's been a huge amount of effort from all concerned – starting with us as writers but then designers, editors and proof readers have all been busily involved. We’re really pleased with the end result and, even if we might be a little biased, we’re confident it’s going to be a stunning book.


Right now though, while the presses are rolling, we can afford a short break and what could be better than a cup of tea and slice of toast? The short season for Seville oranges is upon us so, of course, it’s time to make marmalade. Here’s the recipe from our January chapter:


Seville orange marmalade


Crisp toast slathered in salty butter with a good dollop of marmalade makes for a pretty special start to the day. As an alternative, try mixing a tablespoon of marmalade into a small pot of fat-free Greek yoghurt along with a spoonful of oats that have been toasted with a little muscovado sugar. Let the mix sit overnight and enjoy in the morning.


makes around 6 large jars


1.1kg Seville oranges, well washed

2 lemons, well washed

2kg preserving sugar

10g unsalted butter


1. Start by halving and juicing all the fruit, retaining all the pips. Use a teaspoon to scrape the membranes out from the juiced fruit.


2. Cut the skins in half again and slice off some of the white pith if it is really thick. Next, slice the skins into strips of your choice of thickness, depending on whether you want a fine shred or a coarser one. The shreds will swell as they cook to an extent. (I add the lemon skins to the mix, although many recipes call for just the juice and I would have to accept that maybe it isn’t a true Seville orange marmalade.)


3. Measure the juice from the fruit and make up the quantity to 2l with water. Put the juice and shredded peel into a large saucepan. Tie the pips and around a quarter of the membranes in muslin and add this to the pan. Bring to the boil and then simmer very gently until the peel is tender, around 1–1½ hours.


4. Remove the muslin bag and squeeze all the juice out into the pan – if you have a potato ricer it is brilliant for doing this!


5. Warm the sugar in a roasting tin in the oven set to 100˚C for 10 minutes. (This is recommended in many recipes to aid dissolving. I use the oven to sterilize the jars, too.)


6. Add the warm sugar to the pan and stir constantly until it has dissolved, then increase the heat and boil the marmalade rapidly for 5 minutes before starting to check for a set. If using a thermometer it should register 104–105˚C. Or pour a spoonful onto a chilled saucer; when the edge of the pool of marmalade is pushed, the skin should wrinkle.


7. Once a set is achieved, pour the marmalade into the sterilized jars and seal.



By Well Seasoned, Jan 2 2018 09:49AM

Happy New Year! Hope you all had a fantastic Christmas


2018 is, obviously, an exciting year for us and we're now on the three month countdown to publication day for the book. We've probably got one more final proof read to do before everything is set in stone and the book goes to print.


Until then, assuming you've had enough turkey and sprouts to last a lifetime (or until next Christmas anyway), how about a new recipe from Russell to launch your January? Walter Rose are a traditional butchers in Wiltshire and Russ has long used them to supply top-notch meat and game, both for his restaurant and for our Well Seasoned recipe testing. On their blog this month is a picanha rump cap recipe. Paprika and pickled jalepenos add a bit of welcome warmth to some classic winter ingredients - parsley root, cabbage and apples.


You can find the recipe HERE.


By Well Seasoned, Dec 16 2017 10:00AM

Well, hopefully you’ve seen that the book is now available to pre-order (if you haven't we've failed!)


Having put so much hard work into writing and photographing over the last couple of years it’s a really exciting time for us now as we can start to reveal some of the recipes and content.


Since we’re in the festive season, how about this as a little present? It's from the Decemeber chapter.


Clementine and sultana frangipane tarts


They are as enchanting as any bauble on a Christmas tree: the shine, the vibrant orange colour and, occasionally, the contrast of green leaves. The clementine is, to my mind, inextricably linked with the festive season, and so one thought led to another and an alternative to a mince pie came to the fore. Baked as small tarts or as one large tart to slice, this brings together so many of my seasonal favourites. Add some clotted cream or spiced brandy butter, a little of the fresh fruit and just a touch of the clementine confit and dessert is sorted. Or, of course, as the cook, you can indulge in some quality control straight from the cooling rack…


I make no apologies for this being a complex recipe and, in mitigation, all the elements could be made separately over a number of days and then assembled before baking. The confit will keep for several weeks, the frangipane and pastry freeze well and you could even blind bake the pastry cases the day before you cook the tarts.


(If you need a bit more guidance, you can also find this recipe with step-by-step photos on Russell’s website HERE.)


Makes 12 small tarts using a deep muffin tin


For the sweet pastry


115g unsalted butter

85g caster sugar

2 Blackacre Farm free range egg yolks

2tbs cold water

55g corn flour

180g soft plain flour

2g Maldon salt, fine ground


For the clementine confit

(makes much more than required but has many other uses)


8 clementines

500g granulated sugar

500ml water

2 cinnamon sticks

10 black peppercorns

For the frangipane

100g unsalted butter

100g dark muscovado sugar

1½ large, free-range eggs (100g)

1 tbs self-raising flour

100g roasted almonds, blitzed to a powder

1 tsp mixed spice

pinch of finely ground Maldon salt


For the sultanas


100g sultanas

100ml cider


First make the pastry. Cream the butter and caster sugar together. Beat until the mixture starts to go pale. Combine the egg yolks and the water and beat gradually into the butter mix. Mix the flours and the salt and sift onto the butter mix. Use a rubber spatula to fold the flour in – you are aiming for dough that is homogenous but has been worked as little as possible. Turn the dough onto a floured surface and bring together into a cylinder. Wrap in cling film and chill for at least 30 mins.


Then, when you're ready to cook.


1. Preheat oven to 170C.


2. To make the clementine confit, start by blanching the clementines. Cover with cold water, bring to a boil then simmer gently for 10 minutes, then drain and refresh in cold water. Repeat three more times.


3. In a clean saucepan, combine the sugar, water and spices and bring to the boil, stirring to dissolve the sugar. Prick the blanched clementines several times with a cocktail stick, add to the syrup and cover with baking parchment. Use a saucer or small plate to keep the clementines submerged and simmer very gently for around 1½ hours. Using a slotted spoon, transfer to a blender and purée until completely smooth. Use a little of the cooking syrup if necessary. You are looking for a consistency similar to lemon curd.


4. For the frangipane, cream together the butter and sugar. Gradually beat in the egg, adding the flour in stages along with it. Fold in the almonds, mixed spice and salt and combine thoroughly. Transfer to a piping bag.


5. Simmer the sultanas in the cider until all the liquid is reduced/has been absorbed. Allow to cool.


6. Roll out the sweet pastry to approximately 4mm thick and use to line your chosen tart tin. Chill and then blind bake at 170C until just set and a light golden colour.


7. Add enough clementine confit to the sultanas to create something akin to mincemeat. Place a generous teaspoonful in the tart shells if individual, or spread across the base of the tart if making a large one. Pipe on the frangipane and bake at 170C for around 20 minutes until the frangipane is risen and firm when pressed lightly.


8. Allow to cool slightly in the tin and then remove to a cooling rack. Store in a sealed container at room temperature.


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