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By Well Seasoned, May 23 2018 11:53AM

We’ve had some fantastic weather already this year and as I look out the window across a hazy London skyline I can confidently say summer is finally in sight. It’s time for long, cooling drinks, barbecues and lazy days in the garden. These two recipes, from our May and June chapters will help you make the most of the sunshine.


Near us, the elderflowers are just coming into bloom and you’ve probably got two to three weeks to gather your haul. Likewise, the herb garden is at its peak right now, before the scorching hot weather arrives, which will often be too much for delicate basil plants, so it’s time to get picking and make a batch of pesto.


Harry McKew’s elderflower cordial (by Jon)


Harry McKew was my grandfather and a master maker of cordials, jams and pickles. He taught me a great deal of what I know about preserving. While I was researching the book, his original recipe, written on a tatty scrap of paper, fell out of the pages of an old paperback. It’s as if he wanted me to share it with you. The citric acid is essential if you want your cordial to last (it will help it keep for months rather than days) but not if you plan to drink it straight away.


makes approximately 1.5l of cordial

25 elderflower heads

1.7l water

1.5kg sugar

4 oranges and 2 lemons, chopped

50g citric acid (available from chemists)


1. Cut off any leaves and inspect each elderflower head for any insect passengers. Pour the water into a large pan and bring to the boil. Take off the heat and add the sugar, stirring until dissolved. Add the heads, fruit and citric acid to the pan. Stir well then cover and leave to infuse for 24–48 hours.


2. Strain the liquid though a clean tea towel or muslin, then pour into sterilized bottles and seal.


3. To serve, dilute the cordial about 10:1 with still or sparkling water. (You can also add it to sparkling wine for a classy dinner-party aperitif.)



Basil pesto (by Russ)


As a taste of summer goes, basil has to be high in the charts; an association with Mediterranean holidays, maybe? On a warm summer’s day, is there anything much better than a plate of perfectly ripe tomatoes drenched in good olive oil, strewn with freshly torn basil leaves and finished with crunchy sea salt, perhaps with a chilled glass of good rosé to hand? There are various types of basil used in many different national cuisines but I guess the strongest association is with Italy and genovese pesto. In Dino Joannides’s excellent book on Italian cuisine, Semplice, he talks about the unique terroir where Ligurian basil is grown, the sweetness of its aroma and how the leaves are harvested young before being combined with pine nuts, pecorino cheese and the best sweet olive oil. As with other green sauces such as salsa verde, the actual recipe isn’t vitally important, as everyone has their own preference. The key is the best possible ingredients you can lay your hands on.


I have a love of Spanish Arbequina olive oil, a brand called Mestral, but you will have your own favourite. I like a little lemon juice in my pesto to give some acidity, but using a sharp pecorino cheese will help in this direction. Most recipes evolve over the years; when I was first taught to make pesto it was in large quantities in a food processor and we always toasted the pine nuts, but I have come to prefer using untoasted ones for a sweeter, creamier flavour. Old Winchester cheese is a good alternative to the Parmesan often used in pesto, but feel free to blend and experiment.


Making pesto is a great way of extending the season or using up a glut and isn’t the exclusive domain of basil. I find wild garlic pesto (see recipe on p. 70) keeps well in the fridge for several weeks, but basil pesto has more delicately nuanced flavours and is best served as fresh as possible. Equally important if you are using pesto in a hot dish is to add it at the last minute to preserve the colour and flavour.


serves 4 for a pasta main course


1 clove of garlic

1 tsp Maldon sea salt

30g pine nuts

50g basil leaves, roughly chopped

20g pecorino, coarsely grated

30g Old Winchester, coarsely grated

50–60ml light, fruity olive oil

1–2 tsp lemon juice


1. Using a pestle and mortar, pound the garlic, salt and pine nuts to a paste. Gradually work in the basil leaves, pounding and rotating with the mortar.


2. Once all the basil has been incorporated, mix in the cheese and then the olive oil. Check the seasoning and add a little lemon juice to taste. You can, of course, use a food processor for this – just check that the blades are sharp and use the pulse button.


By Well Seasoned, Apr 30 2018 03:14PM

Rooks were once eaten in large numbers in Britain and especially on Rook Sunday - the Sunday closest to 13 May - when it was common to raid rooks' nests for fledgling birds (also called "squabs" or "branchers"), which start to leave the nest in late spring. The young birds were the main ingredient in rook pie, a celebrated delicacy in parts of the country. The practice has all but died out now although you will very occasionally still find rook for sale in high end butchers and game dealers.


These members of the crow family are very sociable and you'll most often see (and hear) them nesting in their hundreds in tall trees to the side of open farmland. Rooks have thinner beaks and a light, bare face whereas crows have black beaks and faces, but if you have trouble identifying them, remember the country saying that "a crow in a crowd is a rook and a rook on its own is a crow."


Since we're talking about birds we don't usually eat, it's worth a mention of one other this month. In April we saw the start of the season for an ingredient that has one of the shortest periods of availability - asparagus, which is around for just 8 weeks. Well, this month we can go one better.


The season for wild gulls eggs usually kicks off in the last week of April and runs until mid-May – just three weeks - until the birds begin sitting on their nests. A tiny (and shrinking) army of just 25 government-licensed collectors is be permitted to raid the cliffs of our coastline, taking a single egg from each nest of black headed gulls.


Before you scramble out of the front door to get hold of a box of gulls eggs, there are a few reasons why you might not be too concerned about this particular foodie season.


First, despite their beautiful appearance, gulls eggs don't actually taste that different. Whilst aficionados will tell you that they are creamier and gamier that hens eggs, the truth is that unless you have pretty refined taste buds, you won't have an eggy epiphany when you crack open the speckled shell of a gull's egg.


Secondly, from an ethical perspective, some conservationists (including the RSPB) have expressed concerns over the possible impact of the collection on the gull population, which has, in the recent past been in decline. Numbers do now appear to be on the increase again and the RSPB's concerns mainly relate to unauthorised collection by people who cause damage to the nesting sites.


Tim Maddams - the Ethical Foodie blogger for the Ecologist magazine recently told me there is "No shortage of gulls - in fact probably the opposite due to human wastefulness. [It's a] sustainable harvest that helps reduce numbers." However, the species remains on the Birds of Conservation Concern (BoCC) Amber list as a species with "unfavourable conservation status", so definitely one to keep an eye on.


Finally, and possibly most importantly, they are wallet-scarringly expensive. A single egg will set you back up to fifteen pounds in London's trendiest food quarters. Now, given the hard work required to collect them, it's not necessarily bad value for money as such, but they are unlikely to be your choice for a quick omelette, especially if you've got guests round. This is perhaps why every year a good proportion of the eggs collected are eaten not at home but in the poshest restaurants and at special Gulls Egg Dinners held in London's swankiest gentlemen's clubs (and why I've chosen a picture of hen's eggs to accompany this piece...)


By Well Seasoned, Apr 8 2018 04:00AM

Chocolate, mascarpone and raisin cake


There is very little around in the way of fruit at this time of year; some rhubarb, yes, and maybe the late blood oranges, but it is a tough time if you enjoy something sweet. This cake relies on the store-cupboard staples of chocolate, dried fruit and spice, which also brings in some of the flavours we associate with Easter. The mascarpone filling is not at all sickly, and good-quality dark chocolate brings its own bittersweet notes.


serves 10-12


For the cake


100g dark chocolate

150g unsalted butter

50ml vegetable oil

60g golden syrup

3 large free-range eggs

50g plain yoghurt

80ml semi-skimmed milk

250g self-raising flour plus ½ tsp baking powder

25g cocoa powder

1 tsp Maldon sea salt, finely ground

150g light muscovado sugar


For the filling


125g raisins

1 cinnamon stick

½ vanilla pod, split and seeds scraped out

1cm piece of root ginger, peeled

water to cover

50g light muscovado sugar

150g mascarpone


For the ganache topping


100g good-quality milk chocolate, broken into small pieces

80ml double cream


1. Preheat the oven to 160˚C.


2. For the cake, melt the chocolate, butter, oil and syrup together in a large bowl, either on a low setting in the microwave or over a pan of simmering water. Combine the eggs, yoghurt and milk, beating together well. Sift the flour, baking powder, cocoa and salt together and rub through the sugar, making sure to remove any lumps. Mix the egg mix into the chocolate mix, then make a well in the flour mix and add the everything is completely combined.


3. Pour into a greased and lined 20cm loose bottomed cake tin and bake for 60–70 minutes (check after 30 minutes and cover with foil if it is starting to get too dark). The cake should be well risen, may have some cracking and a skewer will come out virtually clean.


4. Allow to cool for 10 minutes in the tin, then remove and wrap in cling film while still hot. This helps to keep the cake moist. Place on a wire rack to cool completely.


5. To make the filling, place the raisins, cinnamon, vanilla and ginger in a small pan and just cover with water. Bring to the boil and then simmer until the liquid has completely evaporated. Tip onto a plate, discard the vanilla and cinnamon and chill. Beat the muscovado

into the mascarpone and allow to stand for 15 minutes. Beat again and check the sugar has dissolved. Fold in the cold raisins and grate in the piece of ginger from the pan using a fine grater. Mix well.


6. For the topping, heat the cream to simmering point in a pan, pour the chocolate over it and let it sit for 5 minutes. Use a small whisk to emulsify the cream and chocolate together. Press cling film directly onto the surface and allow to cool.


7. To assemble, split the cake in half and trim the top if it is really uneven. Fill with the mascarpone and raisin mix and then coat the top with the ganache. Shave some chocolate curls over the top using a potato peeler if desired.


By Well Seasoned, Mar 27 2018 09:41AM

Crisp, buttery pastry, tender chicken and a wonderfully pungent, garlicky sauce mean this is a dish of bold flavours. Simple greens as an accompaniment make a good foil and both cavolo nero and purple sprouting broccoli should be plentiful at this time of year. It is hard to decide whether the chicken, the pastry or the wild garlic is the star of the show but the garlic is such a seasonal treat. The same quantity in a fish pie is really good too.


Chicken, leek and wild garlic pie

serves 4 as main course


For the flaky pastry


200g plain flour

1 tsp Maldon sea salt, finely ground

150g salted butter, chilled

1 large free-range egg yolk

100ml cold water


For the filling


2 tbsp olive oil

2 skinless, boneless chicken breasts, cut into large dice

4 rashers of smoked, streaky bacon, cut into 1cm pieces

500g leek, trimmed, sliced and washed

100ml dry white wine

300ml chicken stock

1 tsp Dijon mustard

75g crème fraiche

cornflour to thicken

50g wild garlic, stalks removed

1 large free-range egg yolk mixed with 1 tbsp of water to glaze the pastry

Maldon sea salt and freshly ground black pepper


1. Preheat the oven to 170˚C.


2. For the pastry, sift the flour and salt onto the bench, grate the butter over the flour using a coarse grater. Stop every now and again to toss the butter through the flour with your fingertips and to dust the grater with flour.

3. Make a well in the centre, then beat the yolk into the water and pour into the well. Gradually bring in the flour with your fingertips to create a dough. Knead briefly and then wrap in cling film and rest in the fridge for 30 minutes before using.


4. To make the filling, season the chicken breast and fry in the olive oil in a very hot pan. This is just to colour the chicken, not to cook it through. Remove the chicken to a plate and add the bacon to the pan. When the fat is starting to render, add the leeks and cook until just beginning to soften. Add the leek mix to the chicken.


5. Pour the wine into the pan. Reduce the wine to a syrup and add the chicken stock. Reduce this by around two-thirds then whisk in the Dijon mustard and creme fraiche. Mix 1 tsp of cornflour with a little cold water and use this to thicken the sauce – a thick double cream consistency is what you are looking for.


6. Add the chicken mix to the sauce and adjust the seasoning. Finely chop the wild garlic and stir it in.


7. Divide the pastry into two pieces; one-third and two-thirds. Roll out the larger piece to line the base of a 22cm x 16cm pie tin. Add the filling to the tin and then roll out the remaining pastry for the lid. Egg-wash around the rim of the pie

base and lay the lid over. Crimp the lid onto the base, sealing well, and trim off excess pastry. Egg wash the lid.


8. Bake the pie for around 40 minutes until the pastry is a dark golden colour and there are signs of the filling bubbling.


9. Serve immediately with your chosen veg. Any leftover pie is delicious cold!


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